Beer Braised Pot Roast

·

One of the hazards of being a professional recipe developer is that people think I have a lavish spread of food on the table each night. They believe that my children arrive at supper, perfectly groomed, perfectly mannered, and ready to eat whatever delicacy I’ve placed in front of them–even vegetables. They believe that somehow my mealtimes are highly organized affairs, and always delicious, certainly. And most of all, they believe that everything that I make is perfect and scrumptious, even on the first try.

Lies. Lies. And more dirty lies.

Perhaps you’ll be relieved to know that our mealtimes are, in fact, very normal and look much like yours. I scramble to put dinner on the table in between our weekday evening obligations, just like you. My kids put their elbows on the table, chew with their mouths open and forget to put their napkins in their laps, just like your kids. And sometimes I make something that tastes truly awful, just like you do. Well, maybe you don’t, and that would be awesome. But sometimes I definitely do. We say, Well that’s not going to be a repeat! (Just to be polite.) But what we really want to say is, Dayum, that really sucks!

This pot roast, however, definitely did not suck. It was succulent, rich and had tremendous depth of flavor from a long, slow braise in beer, mushrooms, and onions. I will never make pot roast another way, it was that good!

My kids didn’t touch it.

I tried not to be angry. I really did. But my feelings were seriously hurt. What is wrong with these little twerps? They truly have no idea how good they have it. I knew my daughter wouldn’t eat any (she’s a vegetarian), but the boys? C’mon, can’t you give your long-suffering mother a break for once? Apparently not. So the lot of them went to bed hungry, (they didn’t even eat the cheddar mashed potatoes). My husband and I, on the other hand, went to bed fat and happy. (Thankfully my anger dissolved into the bottle of red wine.)

The plus side of kids not eating dinner is, obviously, more for us.  I’m going to add a little chipotle chile powder to the sauce, and call it barbacoa. We’ll eat it for lunch, on warmed corn tortillas, topped with cilantro and onion. And after all my hard work yesterday, my ungrateful offspring can enjoy a bowl of cold cereal for dinner. Just kidding. Or am I? I’m having popcorn and a glass of chilled, white wine for dinner. Because, you see, I’m just like you…and sometimes I really don’t feel like cooking ever again. 

Beer Braised Pot Roast
 
Prep time
Cook time
 
This impressive pot roast is among the best I've ever had. The mushrooms and onions, as well as the beer lend great depth of flavor. Though the meat must braise in the oven for hours to become tender, the prep time is fairly minimal. Serve over noodles or buttery mashed potatoes.
Serves: serves 6-8
Ingredients
  • 4-5 pound boneless beef chuck roast
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt (or kosher salt)
  • 3 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 8 ounces sliced mushrooms
  • 2 large yellow onions, peeled, halved and cut into half-inch slices
  • 1 cup gluten-free beer (I used Red Bridge)
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • 2 tablespoons Bragg's Liquid Aminos (or gluten free soy sauce)
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 large bay leaf or (2 small)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Season the chuck roast liberally all over with salt and pepper. Drizzle the oil in a large Dutch oven or other heavy bottomed, flame-proof casserole and heat over medium-high heat. Add the meat to the pot and brown well on all sides. Take time with this so that a dark, golden brown color is achieved. Remove meat from the pot and set aside.
  3. If necessary, add more oil, then the mushrooms and onions. Turn the heat down to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until the moisture has been rendered from the mushrooms, everything has become tender and the onions are translucent, about 10 minutes.
  4. Place the meat back in the pot, on top of the mushroom and onion mixture. Add the beer, beef stock, Liquid Aminos, tomato paste (along the side into the liquid) and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer, cover and place in the oven for about 3½ hours, or until the meat is tender and completely falling apart.
  5. Serve immediately, or cool to room temperature and refrigerate overnight. When ready to serve, scrape off the solid fat layer from the top and reheat in the oven or on the stove top until warmed through.

Similar Mains Posts

5 Comments

  1. That looks amazing. Kids have insane taste buds. More for you! I can eat pot roast for days. I’ve done chicken in a beer braise, but never pot roast. Now I’m going to have to try it. Thanks for the recipe!

    1. Sure thing, Gina. If you do try it, let me know how it goes!

  2. I am going to give this a try but will replace the gluten free soy with regular soy. I plan to serve this open faced on grilled marble rye with onion jam.
    Thanks for the recipe
    T Thomas

    1. Oh my stars! That sounds spectacular. And I’m jealous you can eat rye bread. I love your idea of serving it as a sandwich. Let me know what you think. 🙂

  3. Hi Alison!

    Could you do this in a slow cooker?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Rate this recipe: